Your question: Can breastfeeding cause vitamin D deficiency in mother?

Breastfeeding woman had a 4.0-fold greater odds ratio of vitamin D deficiency than NPNB women (p = 0.001). In breastfeeding women, the odds increased significantly in the winter and spring months (OR = 2.6; p = 0.029) compared to the summer and autumn months.

Can breastfeeding cause vitamin deficiency in mother?

Breastfeeding is the recommended method of feeding infants because it provides babies with ideal amounts of necessary nutrients and immune factors. Though breastfeeding is great for babies, it does it not provide infants with an adequate intake of vitamin D or B12, and it also increases a mother’s need for vitamin B12.

Why do breastfeeding moms need vitamin D?

It turns out that, if we give nursing mothers enough vitamin D to bring their blood levels up to the likely ancestral levels, then they automatically put all of the vitamin D their baby needs into their own milk, thereby ensuring that the infant gets total nutrition without the need to resort to vitamin D drops.

Can breastfeeding cause deficiency?

Infants who drink breast milk from a mother who consumes adequate amounts of vitamin B12 or infants who drink infant formula, will receive enough vitamin B12. However, if a breastfeeding mother is deficient in vitamin B12, her infant may also become deficient.

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What vitamins are depleted by breastfeeding?

The levels of thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, iodine, and selenium in breastmilk are also affected by how much is in the food the mother eats.

Can breastfeeding weaken mother’s immune system?

We found a dramatic decrease in the proportion of immune cells within the first two weeks of birth. The number of immune cells dropped from as high as 70% in colostrum to less than 2% in mature breast milk.

How much vitamin D does a nursing mother need?

To avoid developing a vitamin D deficiency, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and American Academy of Pediatrics recommend breastfed and partially breastfed infants be supplemented with 400 IU per day of vitamin D beginning in the first few days of life.

Can I take vitamin D instead of my baby?

Bruce Hollis is the lead author of a 2015 study that concluded that supplementing the mothers of exclusively breastfed babies with 6400 IU vitamin D per day is a safe and effective alternative to directly supplementing babies with 400 IU vitamin D per day.

Can I take vitamin D while breastfeeding?

In addition breastfeeding mothers should take a daily Vitamin D supplement of 10 µg per day – in fact as more and more conditions are linked with lack of vitamin D most of us would benefit from taking it regularly.

What supplements to avoid while breastfeeding?

Fat soluble vitamin supplements (e.g., vitamins A & E) taken by the mother can concentrate in human milk, and thus excessive amounts may be harmful to a breastfeeding baby.