What if my breast milk is pink?

Pink breast milk is often harmless, but it may also signal a possibly dangerous bacterial infection. … Blood commonly causes red or pink breast milk when small vessels burst in the nipple area. And while this may sound a bit unappetizing, the milk is still perfectly safe for babies.

What does it mean if your breast milk is pink?

Breast milk can turn into a pinkish color due to colonization by Serratia marcescens, a species of rod-shaped gram-negative bacteria that produce a reddish-orange tripyrrole pigment called prodigiosin1 that has been related to a variety of diseases and even newborn deaths.

Can babies drink pink breast milk?

In most cases, it’s safe or even helpful to continue breastfeeding if you see blood in your breast milk. This can sometimes be a sign of health problems for the mother, but it’s not dangerous for babies. Some mothers find that blood in the breast milk causes babies to spit up more, but this is rarely cause for concern.

Is it OK if there is blood in my breast milk?

Most cases of blood in the breast milk are treatable and don’t require medical attention. If you notice blood while breast-feeding, pumping, or expressing for longer than a week, see a doctor. In rare cases, blood in the breast milk may be a symptom of breast cancer.

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Why is my breast milk two different colors?

Any unusual color of a mother’s breast milk is due mostly to her diet. For example, food dyes in foods or drinks can alter the color of breast milk. It may be thin and watery looking, and may have a blue or yellow tint to it. It can even take on a hint of green if large amounts of green colored foods are consumed.

Does breast milk change color when you are sick?

Amazingly, the composition of your breast milk changes when your baby is ill. If you’re exposed to a bacterial or viral infection, your body makes antibodies to combat it; these are then transferred to your baby through your milk.

Why there is blood in my breastmilk?

Common causes of blood in breast milk include: “Rusty pipe syndrome” when ducts and milk making cells grow and stretch after birth. A cracked or damaged nipple that bleeds as baby sucks. Damaged capillaries in the breast due to engorgement or rough handling.

Can you still breastfeed with cracked nipples?

If your nipples are cracked or bleeding, it’s okay to continue breastfeeding your baby. To help relieve your discomfort, use the care tips given above. Call your doctor or a lactation consultant if you find it too painful to breastfeed or if you’ve tried home treatment for 24 hours and it doesn’t help.