Frequent question: Is Upset stomach okay during pregnancy?

It’s very common — and normal — to have an upset stomach when you’re pregnant. Chalk it up to pregnancy’s hormonal changes. It usually happens early in pregnancy, while your body is adjusting to the higher hormone levels.

Does an upset stomach affect the baby?

Your baby is protected against stomach viruses and most other germs that manage to get in. In fact, even if you’re violently ill with a stomach virus, the germs rarely get across the barrier (womb) around your baby. Even so, your illness can impact your baby’s well-being.

What can you take for upset stomach while pregnant?

Medicine for Digestive Upsets

  • Antacids (Tums, Rolaids, Mylanta, Maalox, Pepcid, Prevacid)
  • Simethicone (Gas-X, Mylicon for gas pain, Gaviscon)
  • Immodium or BRAT diet (bananas, rice, applesauce, toast or tea) for diarrhea.

How long does upset stomach last in pregnancy?

Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy usually starts before 9 weeks of pregnancy. For most women, it goes away by 14 weeks of pregnancy. For some women, it lasts for several weeks or months. For a few women, it lasts throughout the pregnancy.

What causes stomach upset during pregnancy?

But stomach pains or cramps are common in pregnancy and usually nothing to worry about. Mild stomach pain in early pregnancy (during the first 12 weeks) is usually caused by your womb expanding, the ligaments stretching as your bump grows, hormones constipation or trapped wind.

THIS IS INTERESTING:  How long can leftover breast milk stay?

Can you take anything for morning sickness?

If your morning sickness symptoms persist, your health care provider may recommend vitamin B-6 supplements (pyridoxine), ginger and over- the-counter options such as doxylamine (Unisom) for management. If you still have symptoms, your health care provider may recommend prescription anti-nausea medications.

What are some bad signs during pregnancy?

Warning Signs During Pregnancy

  • Bleeding or leaking fluid from the vagina.
  • Blurry or impaired vision.
  • Unusual or severe stomach pain or backaches.
  • Frequent, severe, and/or constant headaches.
  • Contractions, where your stomach muscles tighten, before 37 weeks that happen every 10 minutes or more often.